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Longevity of the R8 Engine


Mututing

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As I approach the milestone of 90,000 miles and edge closer to reaching 100,000 miles, I have been contemplating the longevity of my automobile and if I am the suitable owner to maintain its ownership.

Upon perusing Autotrader for Audi A8 vehicles manufactured between 2014 and 2016, equipped with the same V8 engine as my own car, I was astounded by the scarcity of high mileage options. What is the reason behind this?

Do these engines typically have a lifespan of just 100,000 to 150,000 miles? Do automobiles with high mileage tend to be sold at inexpensive dealerships that do not advertise on Autotrader? Do those who do their own maintenance and retain their vehicles for a long time often own them at such high mileage? Is it just the case that the V8 engine has a lifespan of no more than 100,000 or 125,000 miles?

I get that there is a scarcity of R8 vehicles with such elevated mileage. The majority of r8 owners do not go on the road excursions that I do, and just a small number use it as a means of commuting for an hour each way on a daily basis. However, shouldn't there be a significant number of Audi vehicles with high mileage that used the same engine?

I anticipate that some individuals may argue that the vehicle should easily reach a mileage of 200,000. However, where is the evidence? What is the reason?

Furthermore, I have apprehensions about the engine, although it is possible that my focus is misdirected. What additional high-value repairs should I be worried about? What is transmission? Are there any further components? What is Rust? What is the determining factor that renders high mileage autos uneconomical to repair due to the repair costs exceeding the value of the car? I have eliminated the possibility of indicator fluid, but I am really interested in knowing what I should consider and allocate funds for.

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In addition to the magnetic rides and air conditioning compressor, the ball joints and suspension bushings will experience wear and tear over time.

I comprehend that the facelift V8 models were really V10 engines with two cylinders removed, which implies that the engine's lifespan should be considerable. However, if you exceed 100,000 km, it is advisable to consider changing the timing chains and timing guides, since they have a limited lifespan. It is crucial to avoid timing chain failure, as it might result in engine failure.

Over time, motor mounts will develop leaks, which requires the engine to be removed in order to fix them.

Dual clutch gearboxes need regular fluid changes every 30,000 km or 3 years to effectively remove worn clutch and metal debris. It is important to be prepared to replace the mechatronic unit since the sensors and solenoids on it may deteriorate over time.

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Mututing, the R8 V8 was jointly used with the RS4, hence it is the specific model you should focus on. There are other vehicles with over 100,000 miles available for purchase. The highest mileage presently listed for sale on Autotrader is 180,000 miles.

Although the RS4 is not a R8, it is still a remarkable vehicle, therefore it is unlikely that many of them will have too high mileage. However, there is no evidence to suggest that these engines will not be able to go hundreds of thousands of kilometres without difficulty. If the engine is properly maintained, there is no need for concern. The gearbox might be a more significant risk, if anything... Dual-clutch transmissions (DCTs) are relatively recent innovations in comparison to regular automatic transmissions, and they tend to be more costly. However, I must admit that I lack any empirical evidence on this matter and have not made any effort to investigate more.

If anything, I anticipate that you may have nuisance problems far in front of experiencing a significant technical breakdown in either the engine or gearbox at this stage. Revisit the issue when the mileage of the vehicle reaches between 150,000 and 200,000 kilometres. 🙂

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A few of years ago, I sold my set of wheels to a frequent driver who had a V10 vehicle (I believe he was mostly interested in acquiring the tyres that were included with the wheels). He owned an independent automotive repair business and informed me that the Dual Clutch Transmissions (DCTs) had a replacement cost of $35,000, which was a contributing factor in his decision to choose a manual gearbox.

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Currently, my inventory of items to examine until I reach a total of 100,000 is as follows:

    Camshaft drive belt
    Chronological references
    Engine Installs ball joints onto mounts.
    Bushings
    The serpentine belt, as recommended by an Audi technician, should be checked at some time.
    Fluid changes refer to the process of replacing or altering the fluids in a system or machine. I rigorously adhere to a scheduled oil change routine based on the number of miles travelled. Are there any more fluids that need to be replaced?
    Carbon Clean


Excluding oil, brakes, tyres, and rotors from the list since I have already taken care of them.

Is there any further information or request you would want to provide? Furthermore, it is important to mention that I am unfamiliar with the subject matter and my level of technical expertise is rather low, comparable to a grade of D-. I just like operating the vehicle and admiring its appearance!

The car's mileage is now 90,500 miles, and I purchased it when it had 8,000 miles. I am curious whether I have accumulated a greater mileage in a R8 than any other individual on Earth. Most likely not, although it must be quite near. If I have really driven the most kilometres, I plan to get a Guinness Book of World Records certificate to display on my wall.

Is there anything else I should consider? I would want to allocate funds for the expenses associated with automobile ownership. I have a strong affinity for numbers and spreadsheets, and after the warranty period has expired, I would want to have a clear understanding of the possible expenses that I may have to bear. Does anybody have estimations of the expenses associated with doing the aforementioned tasks at a dealership or an independent mechanic?

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My acquaintance had a second-generation vehicle from the year 2017 and managed to accumulate a total mileage of 144,000 kilometres on it. It was the most quantity Audi had ever saw. The automobile consistently had a recurring problem of cracked rear tail lights, necessitating many replacements that amounted to a total cost of $4000.

Remember to replace the spark plugs and change the differential and gearbox fluids. Due to my obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), I adhere to a strict maintenance schedule for my vehicle. I replace the oil every 5,000 miles, change the brake fluid every 2 years, and swap out the tyres every 18,000 miles. While it is possible that this may be excessive, I have not had any problems with my second-generation vehicle, which has accumulated 60,000 kilometres.

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@Mututing Although I am hesitant to admit it, I believe it would be advantageous for you to seek out a another V8 vehicle with low mileage and begin over after your current vehicle reaches 108,000 miles. Fidelity plainly relies on the fact that the vast majority of drivers will not come close to reaching the maximum mileage covered by their warranty. I am almost positive that beginning over would result in a more favourable outcome.

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When doing fluid changes, ensure that you also include the gearbox in addition to the engine. If you are planning to see Audi, they should be aware of this and include it as part of your maintenance. However, an independent mechanic who is just required to do an oil change may not mention it to you. The frequency is either quadrennial or sexennial, but I am now unable to recall the exact interval.

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here is a significant likelihood that I will not retain ownership of the automobile until it reaches 108,000 miles, but I am interested in determining the associated expenses. I have a deep appreciation for the first generation of the automobile and its significant historical role in the automotive industry.

I do not get the same sensation with regards to the Gen 2, however it is possible that I may have an even greater affinity for it. After test driving the second generation automobiles, I expressed my strong admiration for their appearance in the subsequent days. I want the availability of a V8 Gen 2 engine, since it is the superior choice for my needs.

My prediction is that when I reach 108,000 miles in 2025, I will most likely get a car from the years 2020 to 2023. At that point, I will decide whether to retain the first generation car as a backup vehicle at one of my locations or sell it. The issue with using the R8 as a backup vehicle is its lack of practicality. Given my interests in biking, hiking, and spending time with family, I want a car with higher seating capacity.

I came close to upgrading to Gen 2 towards the end of 2023, but I ultimately decided against it because to the little depreciation of the Gen 2 model. It seemed imprudent to part ways with a fully functional and desirable vehicle, along with $100,000 in cash, in exchange for a newer but similarly appealing automobile.

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The limited availability of R8 cars in the US, with just 29 units for sale nationwide, contributes to their rarity. Additionally, many R8 owners choose to preserve their vehicles by storing them in garages and only taking them out for occasional drives, such as attending cars and coffee events. That does not imply that once they exceed 75,000, they suddenly and inexplicably disintegrate. The primary factor that negatively affects the lifespan of these motors is the absence of regular use and adherence to adequate maintenance practices. There are several RS4's with mileage above 200,000.

The majority of the objects you have mentioned are visual stimuli. If the motor mounts are in excellent condition, it may not be necessary to replace them.

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I currently do not have a specific timeframe. I will continue driving until I discover an alternative that appeals to me. I am not afraid of high mileage. The automobile is costly, and I am maximising my use of it. I do not handle the vehicle delicately and I drive it as often as I do my Prius. I use the vehicle in rainy conditions, for trips to the beach, and for grocery shopping, exactly as one would with any other automobile.

The problem I am now facing is the occasional flashing of the airbag occupancy sensor light, without any accompanying mechanical issues.

The one additional concern was to the gen 2's notorious problem of the dash peeling.

If any components were to malfunction, I would seize that chance to enhance my setup by replacing them with high-performance parts. I do this task on all of my automobiles. If something is not broken, it is advisable not to interfere with it. If the item is damaged, then proceed to enhance or replace it.

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In my opinion, the additional problems in the second generation are related to the magnetic ride control system and the occurrence of misting in the tail lights. I am uncertain whether the AC Compressor is also a problem with Gen 2. Is my understanding accurate?

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Upon examining the UK eBay platform, I have observed that there are a total of 51 B7 RS4s available for sale. It is noteworthy that more than half of these vehicles have surpassed the 100,000-mile mark, and specifically, 6 of them have accumulated mileage over 150,000 miles. Ensure proper maintenance and it will have a longer lifespan.

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