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Considering upgrading from a CLS W257 to a CLS W219. Contemplating between logic and emotions, what should I choose?


JamesStv

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Greetings

I have a CLS 350D W257 that I have had for about two years. Owning a CLS was my ambition, and I have finally achieved it. Spending £554 monthly on a car (comprising £406 for the car, £52 for MB service plan, and £96 for extended MB warranty) is prompting me to reconsider. Redirecting these funds towards overpaying my mortgage for the next 7 years could lead to mortgage-free status. Additionally, with my workplace moving from a 72-mile daily commute to a 4-mile daily commute (likely walkable), this might be the opportune moment to consider V8 ownership. Due to the chip shortage, companies like webuyanycar are offering me around £32k for my car, but my settlement amount is £23k. I am considering purchasing the vehicle for £23k and then selling it to buy a W219 CLS petrol 5.5 litre version.

I am aware that transitioning from a new automobile to a 15-year-old car would need some adjustment. I want to test drive a CLS500 over the weekend to familiarise myself with it. I would appreciate hearing thoughts from other Mercedes-Benz owners or automobile enthusiasts since they may provide more valuable insights compared to my wife, who is not interested.

The decision involves a conflict between emotions and logic. I am considering forgoing the warranty on my present car and keeping it, although it will likely remain parked for extended periods, especially since it is a diesel vehicle. I was considering the CLS55 / CLS 6.2 AMG but I'm afraid they could be costly to maintain. If I save roughly £500 a month, I would have plenty money to cover any significant unexpected expenses. Is there a possibility that a CLS55 / 6.2 AMG might appreciate in value in the future?

There is now just one CLS550 with low mileage available for sale in the UK. Should I retain my vehicle and attempt to sell it fast once I find the ideal CLS550, or should I consider purchasing the one available for sale today? Ideally, I would like a CLS550 with lesser miles from 2008 with LED taillights, however it seems that they are not available. I prefer not to purchase a vehicle with more than 100,000 miles on it.

Another concern I have is about the headlights of my current CLS. I like the brightness of my present headlights and wonder whether there is a legal method to enhance the brightness and whiteness of the W219 lights. Has anybody modified the Xeon projector like some Americans have done? The appearance of my vintage Clio 182 Xeons is superior to that of the CLS lights.

Anticipating response eagerly.

Cheers

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When dealing with significant differences in age-related issues like underbody rust, it may be wise to prioritise youthfulness. Consider allocating the £148 per month towards servicing instead of opting for a service plan and extended warranty. Diesel vehicles generally require less maintenance, such as oil changes and filter replacements, which can be cost-effective if done by a reliable local mechanic or independent Mercedes-Benz specialist. Opting for a diesel vehicle over a petrol one can result in fuel savings, especially for short journeys. Additionally, limiting the mileage on a newer car can contribute to maintaining its resale value. Consider the choice to return carefully, weighing the financial implications. Ensure that the older vehicle can be maintained long-term and seek a well-kept replacement.
I wish you the best in your decision-making process, since reversing it may be challenging in the future. The reg would not add much value to the one you saw.

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Thank you for responding. Your arguments are very valid. The inability to return is a significant issue for me. I often use a work van, which helps me save my mileage. My vehicle was parked at work all week, but I drove it back tonight, and it still brings me joy.
Finding a well-maintained CLS is important. I considered that an older vehicle could be expensive to maintain, so my estimated monthly cost of £406 may not have been far off.
I am strongly considering forgoing the warranty but retaining the service plan, since I believe it would enhance the resale value if I decide to keep it. I can transfer the warranty to the future owner if they like, which I believe would be a compelling advantage as a private seller, beyond an AA warranty 😉

I'm not a huge supporter of electric vehicles, but what do you think about the government potentially implementing new legislation that might significantly reduce the presence of diesel automobiles on the market? Losing £7,000 on a vehicle is OK to me, but losing £32,000 is not. I am being extreme and considering the worst-case situation, when people need the fuel efficiency that a diesel automobile can provide. Without the chip scarcity, I would continue making my monthly payments and could purchase the item for £16K at the conclusion of the term. I believe its value would exceed £16K in two years.

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Purchasing a well-maintained 15-year-old CLS will not result in ongoing costly repairs; get it evaluated by a local independent mechanic. If your mileage is modest, you will likely see little depreciation. The cost of maintenance is unlikely to exceed that of your existing warranty, which may not cover all potential issues. I would be more worried about the dependability of your recent diesel vehicle in the next years, particularly if you want to use it for short trips. In 3-5 years, as the transition to electric vehicles and petrol hybrids gains momentum, the present diesel generation with its intricate and costly pollution control systems will likely become unwanted. I agree with you. A high-performance petrol car priced at 219 with extra money to pay off the mortgage is a more advantageous option in my opinion.
 

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Due to financial constraints, I have mostly owned vehicles that are more than a decade old during my adult years. I have consistently opted for pricey new autos, acknowledging the danger but not finding it monetarily daunting.
If you save £100 a month to keep a w219, you probably won't need more unless really unfortunate, considering your current significant monthly expenses. With minimal mileage, it's best to grin with every cold start.
Make smart purchases and choose a reputable independent dealer in your area. It is advisable for everyone to own a V8 engine vehicle at some time, since they will become scarce in the near future.
The engine is quite durable, but the 7g gearbox may have occasional issues, once repaired, it may last for many years. Aside than that, it is routine maintenance.

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In my opinion, starting in 2024, it would be wise to invest significant funds in upgrading to a modern petrol or diesel vehicle rather than sticking with electric automobiles. It will be dangerous for everyone since we are uncertain about the government's intentions, such as whether they would impose taxes on these vehicles or prohibit them from certain locations.
Uncertain. My approach is to either maintain my current automobile or switch to a high-quality, low-mileage vehicle that is fuel-efficient and has minimal emissions to avoid being charged for driving on the road. I purchased a new hybrid Rav4 a year ago and really disliked it. The tyre noise on some bumpy roads was causing me discomfort due to the continuous low-pitched sound. The engine performance was unsatisfactory for me, so I sold it and purchased a 2016 GLC 2.2.

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I would recommend selling your present automobile and walking to work as it is just 4 miles away.

The health advantages will surpass any other considerations, and you may hire any brand if you decide to travel on a vacation.

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Yesterday, I test drove a CLS500.
Are these engines designed to produce a high-pitched sound? Despite reading that the V8 engine in these automobiles is quiet, all I could hear while driving was a concerning whining noise. Nevertheless, I have never experienced riding in a V8 automobile.
The throttle response was very different from that of my vehicle. I had to use more force than anticipated to get the automobile in motion. I slightly accelerated on a dual highway and it performed well. I see the appeal of upgrading to the 5.5 version / CLS55.

Despite the heavier steering compared to mine, I found it comfortable and enjoyable. I was satisfied with the steering and handling of the vehicle on the road. I believe I did not adequately evaluate a suitable example due to the engine noise.

My vehicle seems much faster now. I didn't realise how much diesel engines have improved over the years.

I am considering test driving another vehicle, maybe a CLS55, since I believe the throttle response would be more responsive compared to the car I drove today.

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You are transitioning from an automobile to a vintage vehicle that is suitable for use while travelling. Purchasing a high-quality vehicle with a supercharger may lead to continuous satisfaction and perhaps little depreciation, which can help cover unexpected costs.
I have had my vehicle for six years and have driven an additional 60,000 miles. Despite ageing, I still like it much, valuing both its comfort and its eccentric side.

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The V8 engine is a notable characteristic in these automobiles. I cannot remark on the normally aspirated 5.5 engine. It is not intended for the engines to produce a whining noise. Both the 5.0 and 55 models can be driven calmly for a smooth ride, but when you accelerate, they have impressive power and can overtake most vehicles. Despite their fuel consumption, they can get decent miles per gallon. Distinct from how a dervish releases its force, as mentioned above.

If the mathematics is suitable for you, then I recommend choosing the 55. I have had to replace the SBC and airmatic pump on my vehicle, along with some other components. However, I believe that this maintenance will only need to be done once.

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Standing in front of my C43 and 5.0 E500 cars, you would hear significant drive belt whining sounds, but the muffled V8 audio only becomes noticeable beyond 4k.

The 5.0 engine has a long-travel throttle and lacks the immediate torque characteristic of a diesel engine.

The 5.5 overcomes that issue; when you lightly press the throttle at low engine rpm, it accelerates quickly. It has much greater power than the 5.0 engine over the whole range of revolutions. It reduces the 0-60 time by over a second and the 0-100 time by two seconds. When comparing acceleration times from 0-100 for 5.0, 5.5, and 5.5k, they are around 13.5s, 11.5s, and 9.5s respectively.

The 5.5 is positioned nearly precisely midway between the other two in terms of performance. An E500/CLS500 is more akin to a mini-S Class in terms of character rather than an AMG, as discussed in previous forums. If the AMG is equivalent to an RS6, then the E500 might be compared to the S6.

You would get a somewhat newer 500 and/or one with less miles per unit of weight if that is significant to you. A few years ago, I found that an E63 was around 25-30% more expensive than an identical E500, considering vehicles of the same age with similar mileage.

I would choose a well-maintained version of either a 5.5 or 55K model with a comprehensive service record. It is beneficial to have evidence of maintenance done on the Airmatic system, SBC pump, gearbox flushes, ball joints, and recent disc replacements. Some are treated luxuriously, while others are neglected, and by making wise purchases, you may save spending thousands on upkeep.

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The engine should not produce a whining noise. It may be audible from the outside, but it should not be heard from the inside. Initially, I was surprised by how quiet my vehicle was inside, especially while driving at high speeds on the road. Minimal wind noise, mostly tyre noise, with the engine remaining quiet until acceleration, at which point the V8 sound may be heard in the background. The performance may be described as rather satisfactory. There have been occasions when I want more and regretted not getting the 5.5 instead 😉 The M113 5.0 is quite durable. Transitioning from a turbodiesel engine to a petrol one may result in a perceived decrease in middle power, since petrol engines need higher revs to generate power compared to the torque surge seen in turbodiesels. I wouldn't use it for a daily 4-mile commute to work since the engine wouldn't reach its optimal working temperature.

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I have the 4.7l twin turbo engine, which is a distinct kind of engine known for its power and torque without any complaints. Its acceleration that pushes you back into the rear seat as you accelerate is rather enjoyable.

The car is not available for purchase, but if you are interested in experiencing the performance of a well-behaved CLS500, you may visit Cardiff and I would gladly demonstrate.

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No, they do not whine from the inside, however there may be a little noise from the exterior due to the belts and the air suspension pump starting up. Initially, I was amazed by the quietness of the E500's interior. The whining noise might be caused by several factors, but my first assumption would be a malfunctioning alternator or a/c compressor.

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A CLS500 will consistently make you regret not purchasing the CLS55K.

The CLS500 will be equipped with AirMATIC as a standard feature, leading to comparable potential expenses as the CLS55K.

Previous models of the CLS500, perhaps those produced following the facelift, may also be susceptible to the same SBC pump issues.

However, you are only expected to do these tasks once throughout your ownership, if necessary.

The operating expenses will be comparable, but the CLS55K offers much higher speed.

For a 4-mile journey, I would prefer cycling or walking rather than using it.

However, when you do need to use the CLS, it will provide enjoyment.

By consistently maintaining a vehicle without accumulating mileage, its depreciation should be minimal or nonexistent.

There is a limited but robust market for these specialised AMGs.

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Subsequent facelifted 219 CLS500 models were equipped with the 383bhp 5.5 naturally aspirated engine and eliminated the SBC pump. Subsequently, there were a limited number of 218s (also known as cls500) equipped with the 4.7 dual turbo engine, although these are very rare to come across.

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Out of the 219 CLS lights, only the dipped beam uses xenon, while the main beam uses halogen. Replacing the halogen light with a whiter and brighter Nightbreaker or similar type bulb can improve colour consistency and increase brightness. If you have OCD tendencies, you will also need to replace the side light bulbs and the two fog lights, otherwise they will seem discoloured. Straightforward and cost-effective.

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