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What is your opinion on the Kumho Ecsta PS71 SUV?


Kenjibb

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Does anybody have any firsthand experience with the aforementioned tyres, whether positive or negative?

I will soon need a new pair of front tyres for the Cayenne, since the current P Zero tyres have worn down to a tread depth of 3mm. I want to replace them over the summer.

Option one involves replacing the front tyres with the identical P Zero tyres, which will cost £720 for the pair, including installation.

Option two entails replacing all four tyres with the aforementioned Kumho tyres, which cost £860. Additionally, the rear P Zero tyres, which still have a sufficient 5mm+ of useful tread, may be sold for around £150 or more.

With an annual mileage of about 3,000 miles, I will not need to change the tyres while I own the car if I choose option two. However, if I choose option one, there is a possibility that I may need to replace the much more expensive rear tyres at some time.

As a point of comparison, I have tyres with sizes 285-35-22 and 315-30-22. Additionally, according on the trip data, my average commuting speed is less than 20 mph.

I am posting my question here since the UK Cayenne site is not very active, and the Rennlist forum in the USA only discusses original equipment manufacturer (OEM) rubber tyres, namely Pirelli brand.

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Take a peek at Michelin. The PS4 SUV tyres on the GL have shown a durability that is about double that of the previous Pirelli tyres.

They seem to be much more affordable than the Pirellis that you mentioned as well:

https://www.blackcircles.com/catalogue/michelin/pilot-sport-4-suv/275/35/R22/Y/104/m?tyre=40525712&gad_source=1&gbraid=0AAAAAD7OqRZ1cbOxtTX2Ge3ZwtztU6d9T&gclid=CjwKCAjwoPOwBhAeEiwAJuXRh-cBzXmjXWXeCQL-6QIb6yNTFLFKrStiRL3_NY_eKWrZr_IwK1OcRhoCPsQQAvD_BwE

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The cost of a set of F+R PS4S, including installation, will be around £1500, which is over double the price of a set of Kumho tyres. Undoubtedly, the quality of the tyres would be superior without any doubt. However, considering that the driving will mostly be in urban areas, with just 1% of the driving being on the highway, it is worth questioning if the premium price is justified. As a Scottish person, I could choose for a set of Pace tyres priced at £112 apiece, but it would ultimately be a decision based on false economy, even for a Scottish person.

If feasible, I would want to use rubber components from the same manufacturer and with comparable wear for the sake of the 4WD system.

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Uncertain about the method of measuring the ratio of worth to cost.

Michelin tyres have a higher price point, but they are known for their superior quality and durability.

My tyres have travelled about double the distance as the previous Pirelli tyres. The steering, braking, traction, and tyre noise all exhibit excellent performance, making them worth the additional upfront investment.

I cannot provide a specific opinion on the Kumho tyres, but as a general rule, lower-priced products tend to have worse quality.

The expenses associated with fitting and balance will remain consistent regardless of your choice, thus it is important to take other factors into consideration.

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Are there any problems related to crabbing with Michelin tyres?

The P Zero tyres perform quite poorly in temperatures below 6 degrees Celsius, which has been the case in Scotland since October of last year.

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There are no problems with crabbing on my vehicle, and I also don't remember experiencing any troubles with the Pirelli tyres.

My own financial situation at the time was such that I spent around £800 on Pirelli tyres and £1,000 on Michelin tyres, which was roughly two to three years ago. However, the additional cost has proven to be quite worthwhile.

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I concur that the Kumho tyres' insufficient traction compared to the Goodyear tyres, as well as their inadequate stability when cornering, make them an unworthy choice. Additionally, it is probable that you may want two sets of them within a year.

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I have used Khumo tyres on a high-performance vehicle and have been very satisfied with their performance in both wet and dry conditions. Frankly, I would prefer using almost any tyres over the PZero. Unless you reside in a warm climate, these tyres fail to reach their optimal temperature range in the UK. Moreover, when they are cold, they provide far less information and indication about when they are about to lose traction compared to other tyres I have used. Based on your use, it is unlikely that you would notice significant variations in tyre performance, with the exception of road noise and comfort.

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Unless the automobile is of high quality, I am not interested. However, the tyres can be simply replaced. It is common for many individuals, even authorised dealers, to install cheaper tyres when they anticipate selling the car shortly. The expense of expensive tyres does not contribute to the resale value of a pre-owned vehicle. It may perhaps be a matter of negotiation, but that is the extent of its significance.

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Khumo performed poorly on a rear-wheel drive vehicle with 700 Newton metres of torque. I have had several complaints on the Pirelli, which is somewhat unexpected. The Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric offers exceptional performance, stability, and grip. I have not yet had the opportunity to experience the Michelin. Thus far, I have refrained from using them due to the fact that when I installed them on a 97 horsepower vehicle during the summer season in a very warm climate, the tyre experienced significant wrapping.

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