Jump to content

Front wheel bearings


BuffUpdate

Recommended Posts

My 2016 430i is experiencing a subtle humming sound and vibration that is perceptible via the steering wheel and the driver's seat. The variation is minimal and depends on the pace. I suspected that the wheel balance was compromised when I saw that a wheel weight was absent from the nearside wheel (or at least, that was my first assumption). Today, I had both wheels rebalanced in the hopes that this will alleviate the vibration. Regrettably, it has not. I have elevated the front of the vehicle and have not detected any looseness in the front left wheel. However, I have noticed a little amount of movement in the front right wheel when I grasp it at the 9 and 3 o'clock positions and gently sway it from side to side. The displacement of this movement is about 2mm. I am unable to perceive any motion while swaying in a vertical direction. I assume that these are the first indications of a malfunctioning front wheel bearing. Are there any further hypotheses on the causes that I should consider before proceeding with the purchase of a bearing kit? The car has barely covered 50,000 km, so one would have expected the bearings to survive considerably longer. However, considering the current condition of the country's roads, this may not be surprising.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my experience, wheel bearings often exhibit lateral and vertical movement. If your vehicle is simply moving laterally, I would recommend inspecting the ball joint and tie rods as a first step...

Indeed, it is possible that it might serve as an early indication of a bearing issue. However, I suggest verifying the information provided above before drawing any conclusions. 😉

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you. I attempted to inspect the tie rods and ball joint, but I did not see any discernible motion. I would have expected them to produce a faint "knocking" sound when driven on uneven terrain, but I have not experienced such a noise. I will reevaluate the situation tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I concur with the statement made by RosaStyle before.
I also had a similar issue with my recently acquired e90, but fortunately, there was no noticeable movement in my vehicle.
I decided to replace both bearings simultaneously while I was in the process of arranging to install new discs.
Currently, quiet has great value, as shown by the acronym "lol".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I appreciate all of your responses.
While travelling to work this morning at around 50mph, I detected a little vibration. In response, I used the brakes while maintaining power. The intensity of the shaking decreased dramatically. I am more inclined to believe that the issue is with the wheel bearing. Therefore, I have placed an order for a new one and will assess the situation after I have installed it. This morning, I inspected the tie rods and ball joints using a pry bar and could not detect any looseness or motion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A new bearing was installed this evening. The task that I had anticipated to be a straightforward one-hour endeavour ended up taking two and a half hours. The primary reason is because accessing one of the top Torx bolts that secures the bearing is difficult with a standard Torx socket and wrench owing to the obstruction caused by the bottom of the McPherson strut. I successfully created a tool that is compatible with the Torx bolt and enables me to attach a break bar to the end, facilitating the opening of this particular bolt. All of them are securely fastened, yet once they are opened, they may be readily removed. The second issue was the inadequate fastening of the brake disc using a tiny bolt. In January, the discs were replaced with BMW I. However, upon my arrival, I discovered that the retainer bolt had been fastened so tightly that the Torx bit only rounded off the bolt, necessitating the use of drilling to remove it. Fortunately, I had an assortment of nuts at my disposal to reattach the disc onto the new bearing. In addition to these two problems, the task itself is rather simple and has successfully resolved my vibration issue so far. The whole expense for the 5e task amounted to £50 for the bearing assembly and an additional £20 for the purchase of new Torx sockets, namely the T60 size, which was not included in my previous set.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pleased to hear that you have resolved the issue.
There is a single bolt on the E90 that is rather difficult to fasten, but it does not seem to be as challenging as the one you are describing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The most recent update is that I experienced vibration at higher speeds. As a result, I took the initiative to repair both the front track control arms and tie rod ends. Their affordability is satisfactory, and while there was a little degree of movement in one of the joints, it was not substantial. Nevertheless, my vibration persists and is gradually worse. After replacing the front end pieces, I have noticed that the vibration is originating from the back. Today, I have raised the vehicle and thoroughly inspected the rear linkage and stabiliser bars/suspension. I have not detected any looseness or movement in these components. The propeller shaft joints seem to be in good condition and there is no audible noise coming from the middle bearing. Nevertheless, I discovered that both rear tyres had incurred a substantial bulge on the inner wall (photographs included). Both sides of the wheel are in the same position, which might account for the vibration. The distortion of the tyre may be the cause. In addition to damage from potholes, there are many other factors that might lead to the simultaneous failure of both tyres.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The poor quality of roads in this nation, along with the use of low-quality tyres and rigid suspension, contribute to the issue. Please provide a detailed explanation of your concern.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel the same way. There is a bridge nearby that has expansion joints. These joints used to cause my Landrovers to bounce. I have not driven my BMW over this bridge and do not plan to do so. Rural roads are mostly used by agricultural vehicles such as tractors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a rather indistinct recollection of encountering an unmarked speed bump and making contact with it. While driving on a wet road some time ago, the rear of the vehicle had a significant impact. Additionally, several of the speed cushions that I often ride over are showing signs of wear. It is probable that these factors are the source of the damage, considering that it is located on the inside of the wheel/tyre. I must use more caution in the future. I am grateful that I spent £36 for the policy with my RAC breakdown since it includes the expense of replacing it. (£200 per corner!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...