Jump to content

How did we manage to endure till reaching adulthood?


Thenornpo

Recommended Posts

Jury determines that the scout who died after falling was unjustly slain.

It's unfortunate that this occurred, but my school travels were successful and without any fatalities.

The inquest determined that the Scout Association's negligence had a role in the death. No risk assessment was conducted for the summer camping trip, no on-the-day risk assessment was performed, safety was not discussed with the Explorer Scouts by their group leader, and a Scout qualified first aider did not attend the trip due to absence. Three individuals, including the youngster, deviated from the main hiking group and ascended the mountainside without supervision.

I believe our risk assessment had a teacher loudly warning us to be cautious and well-behaved. They could have had a package of bandages.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Extremely sorrowful.

We engaged in very risky behaviour at Scout camps. The incidents mostly revolved around fire, heights, axes, knives, and motorcycles, sometimes with the assistance of alcohol and pyrotechnics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He ventured out alone, straying from the group without permission, however the Scout leaders are accountable. Will we see scout units moving in a chained formation to prevent any escape in the future?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regrettably, in modern times, someone must be held accountable. Children engaging in playful behaviour and encountering an issue is not an acceptable explanation. I hope the family may find closure and go on with their life, despite the enduring memories and suffering.

During school days, we had a designated area where we would go without supervision and engage in shooting activities. We avoided accidental harm despite having access to ammo for weapons up to an 84mm Carl Gustaf. Occasionally, we playfully shot each other with air guns 😉. Times have changed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I served as a Scout leader for a decade and found that the role was getting more restricted by bureaucratic regulations and legal responsibilities even at that time. I wouldn't consider doing that nowadays. Instances such as these will hinder Scouting's capacity to attract new leaders, ultimately impacting the youth negatively.

This is a tragic situation, but the youngster would probably have made the same choice even if he was under his parents' supervision. Would they be reported to the police for committing manslaughter? I disagree. Consider the current emotional state of such leaders.

The closest we came to causing injury at Scout camp was when someone shattered their arm. It's worth noting that he was a doctor's kid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

During a geology field trip in the early 1970s, we ended our outing early due to the cold and rainy weather and went to a bar with the professor and lecturers. After many scoops, the weather improved, and the professor said that we would ascend the cliff to see the limestone karst scenery we were meant to view, via a very small sheep route up the cliff's face. We proceeded without doing a risk assessment and everyone arrived safely. During a previous visit to the renowned Jurassic coast of Dorset, our adventurous guide insisted on taking a direct route from point A to point B, leading us through dense bramble woods and other obstacles. No individuals without courage or determination are accepted in my university course, regardless of gender or role as a student or instructor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regrettably, common sense is lacking in contemporary times.
Committees, composed of individuals with little practical experience, must approve all decisions.
This is likely to result in the decline of Scouts, since no Scout Leader would want to face legal proceedings.
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

During the late 1960s, our geography instructor arranged a field trip to the Lake District for our class of 30 adolescent guys. The highlight was ascending to the summit of Helvellyn, which included traversing Striding Edge in dense mist, with steep cliffs on both sides. We enjoyed simulating falling by yelling loudly as if we were really falling. Everyone returned safely and we all had a fantastic day out with an excellent instructor.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did not participate in the Scouts, but I was a member of the Air Training Corps (ATC) for a few years throughout my early teenage years. This occurred in the late 1980s. We had an exceptional Warrant Officer who served as a reserve in the special forces. Two memorable items include CS gas training in a decommissioned fuselage part located near our Hut at the former British Aerospace site at Brooklands. During the summer, he instructed us to do a cross-country run first, since CS is reactive to moisture. He was really considerate in that manner. We also engaged in hand-to-hand fighting training to defend against a knife-wielding assailant. The attacker opted to employ a bayonet due to deeming it unnecessary to learn how to fight against an opponent with a stick. Great experiences and valuable knowledge gained.
In 1987, I participated in the Nijmegen marches with the Air Training Corps as a member of the British Military Contingent. Despite being one year below the minimum age requirement (at 15 years old). They modified my 3822 identification card, but there is no need to worry. I have completed five of these tasks since it was a remarkable experience. It is difficult to fathom somebody nowadays tampering with an ID card, which is regrettable in several aspects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Life is about brilliance. Engaging in activities, socialising, enjoying oneself. We would feel embarrassed if our parents drove us to school instead of us being driven there and back. At the age of 5, we were escorted to school on the first day. After that, you independently made your way there with your friends. Now, at home, you spend time in front of a screen with virtual companions, checking your progress on the newest game.
Perhaps the child's mother should have conducted the risk assessment instead of the scout leader.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quite sorrowful. For both the boy's family and the Scout Association. Both will experience hardship.

I am sceptical about a comment attributed to Ben's mother, which may have been misrepresented, a common occurrence in journalistic accounts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why did she allow him to go on the vacation despite not trusting them? I see a tendency to disregard responsibility until an issue arises, at which point action is taken. It is a prevalent mentality among many parents to take for granted when others are caring for their children without charge, whether it is schools, scouting, or any other organisation.

In the late 1970s, I was a Cub Scout leader, and there was one particular instance that exemplified this. A nine-year-old youngster from another troop in our neighbourhood was consistently engaging in risky behaviour and disregarding warnings from the leaders. They informed his parents that if he persisted with his disruptive behaviour, he would be expelled. The parents pleaded for him to stay, guaranteeing the squad that he would behave. After a few weeks, he hurried up to a pile of chairs, climbed them, and subsequently fell, resulting in a broken arm. The parents filed a lawsuit against the troop and were awarded a sum of money equal to the area's yearly budget.

On another occasion, we went camping for the weekend without any problems. Upon our return to the troop hut at the scheduled hour, the majority of parents were already there, eagerly waiting for their children. Within five minutes of our arrival, all the lads save one had been picked up. After an hour, seven-year-old Johnny was still waiting to be picked up. I attempted to call his residence, but there was no response. It was before the era of cell phones, so there were no other means to reach his parents. He was naturally afraid that anything had befallen his parents. I decided to escort him to his residence, but no one was there. I was also concerned. I managed to get the address of another family member from him while he cried. Upon arrival, a lively party was underway, with Johnny's parents really enjoying themselves. It's a relief, despite not receiving any thanks. Upon inquiring about the absence of someone to pick up Johnny upon our arrival, I was informed that they were enjoying themselves and it was my responsibility to care for the children all weekend. That was my last year serving as a Cub Scout leader.

My wife will be assisting in taking the Year 4 students to the Science Museum in London in a few weeks. I will need to remind her to monitor her group closely, not just for their benefit but for her own as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...