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Damage caused by animals to the GLC


AmericaMonster

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My GLC was parked overnight on my driveway after functioning normally during the day. The next morning, there were many warnings appearing about ABS, Cruise control, Limiter, and an engine warning light (Yellow). I made a reservation at my nearby independent garage, where they determined that the problem was caused by rodent-inflicted damage to the ABS sensor on the front left wheel. It is believed that a fox or a squirrel has gnawed on the cable, resulting in a 100mm part being removed.
Has anybody else experienced this phenomenon, and if so, what measures might be taken to avoid its recurrence?

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In some nations, it is rather prevalent for certain vehicles to be declared as total losses due to this issue. It is often believed that the presence of 'ECO' biodegradable materials in the wire looms is a contributing factor to rats being attracted to them.

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I came across information stating that Subaru had used soy fibre in their wire harnesses at some time. Unfortunately, rats were very attracted to this material, resulting in the cars being inoperable.

It is not unusual for even a little coolant leak to attract pests, who may be tempted to eat the leaking substance. If there is also soy wire present, it becomes a plentiful food source for them.

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You have companionship.

I reside in close proximity to a vast expanse of 3,500 acres of forested land. According to the latest tally, there have been 10 instances of squirrel and fox assaults within a year, out of a total of 150 automobiles.

I misplaced the ABS sensor wire on both my MX5 and my son's BMW X5. Additionally, my neighbours experienced the loss of substantial portions of plastic from a recently acquired Cayenne, causing the Porsche to be inoperable for a duration of three months while awaiting replacement parts.

What is the cause of this occurrence? German component suppliers have replaced plastics with "Eco-friendly" coatings. Which are delicious.

I have used a spray infused with the flavour of chilli on the wire in question, which may have deterred the little creatures.

My Indy have extensive knowledge on the root source of the issue.

The squirrel population is becoming unmanageable.

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These are unpleasant objects where you may discover either a dead mouse that died from starvation or the limbs it gnawed off in order to flee. If the entity is still in a state of being alive, then it is necessary to terminate its existence. The only remaining alternative is that the trap has been removed by the rodent, which stopped just before fully stepping across it and instead carried it away to carry out its limb amputation in a more secluded location.

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Mice do not self-amputate their own legs; it is other animals who discover them caught in traps that engage in such behaviour. Many individuals have made similar claims about rabbits caught in snares, disregarding the presence of many foxes in the vicinity.

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Yes, they do.
Firstly, what other creature would exhibit such behaviour in a residential setting? Furthermore, how could it possess the intelligence to avoid stepping on the adhesive trap itself?

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You need one of these. Since the demise of our last bank vole a few years ago due to old age, the current population of bank voles has thrived. I had little interest in birds, but I was more intrigued by rabbits, field mice, and moles.You need one of these. Since the demise of our last bank vole a few years ago due to old age, the current population of bank voles has thrived. I had little interest in birds, but I was more intrigued by rabbits, field mice, and moles.

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Those are the same items mentioned in the subsequent post below your previous one, and they function very well. The previous night, I saw no signs of its presence. However, the next morning, I discovered a deceased individual firmly lodged in that location, which was rather effective. Upon my initial encounter with the device, the instructions indicated that I should fold it and discard it after capturing a mouse. However, I decided to deviate from this recommendation and instead attempted to remove the deceased mouse from the device and reuse it. To my surprise, the adhesive properties of the device were remarkably strong. In fact, while attempting to peel off the mouse, it abruptly snapped, resulting in me being drenched in unpleasant mouse remains. Disgusting! Therefore, I will keep it in place until it has captured many items, and then I will discard it. We own an exceptional feline hunter named Milo, renowned for his prowess in catching mice. However, due to the secure nature of my sealed workshop, Milo is unable to get access when the doors are closed. Consequently, it is logical to maintain a trap inside the workshop. By the way, I purchased my adhesive traps on the online marketplace eBay.

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