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Should I return a certified pre-owned vehicle with a warranty problem to the dealer?


Hypabl

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I purchased a pre-owned Mercedes B Class, B200, AMG that is two years old online from a prominent Mercedes Dealership in England.

When the automobile was delivered, it emitted an unusual noise when the engine was idle.
A trusted local garage, not affiliated with Mercedes, conducted a vehicle health inspection. They commented:

A loud noise is heard while the automobile is moving slowly, indicating an internal issue inside the gearbox that has to be addressed by a dealer.

I contacted Mercedes about the warranty. They said that it probably wouldn't be covered by warranty and I would need to pay GBP 150 for them to inspect it.

Subsequently, I attempted to resolve this issue with the dealer located 200 miles away, thus, I drove the vehicle small distances on local roads.
The banging intensified, first only occurring while I was decelerating when the engine was running at a standstill. It began even at speeds below 30 mph.
The dealership recommended contacting roadside help.

The roadside assistance recommended promptly bringing the automobile to Mercedes.

The vehicle has been in my local Mercedes Dealership for 2 days, however they have not given any updates.

I consider a problem with the gearbox to be significant and probably costly to repair. I typically retain my vehicles for 10-12 years and I'm questioning whether I should anticipate that this automobile will not last for that duration.

Would you want to retain the automobile if the issue can be fixed, or would you prefer to return it to the dealership and search for a new car without any known problems?

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The automobile should come with a one-year guarantee as an authorised used car, in addition to your standard statutory rights.

The £150 price you stated is likely for diagnostics and should be returned if no defect is found. This measure prevents unnecessary diagnostic requests that use dealers' time and resources.

If you approve of the automobile, allow them to repair it. If you are dissatisfied, return the item for a refund if it is defective.

Consider having the local Mercedes-Benz dealer inspect it before making your final selection.

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I upgraded the warranty to a 2-year term.
The local Mercedes-Benz dealer has not reached out to me in 2 days, leading me to suspect a potentially significant problem.

If necessary, I would purchase another B Class automobile to use my legal right to return the current one.

I am worried that a vehicle experiencing a significant gearbox problem at 2 years old may not be dependable by the time it reaches 10 years old, which is typically how long I like to keep my cars.

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If the issue is resolved correctly, it should be just as dependable as any other instance.

The warranty supplements your standard consumer rights.

The selling dealer is responsible for repairing any faults in the automobile or arranging repairs via the dealer network if necessary.

Inquire the dealer currently handling the matter for an update. The absence of communication does not always imply the severity of the situation. They may not have even glanced at it.

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to listen to your difficulties.

I cannot provide insights on the technical aspects, but from a legal standpoint (this is non-professional advise - I am not a lawyer....):

1. Your local dealer is accurate in stating that the issue will not be covered by the 1-Year Approved Used Warranty. The 1-year AU warranty does not cover faults that were visible at the time of sale and should have been identified and fixed by the dealer before the sale. This prevents dealers from shifting the cost of preparing cars for sale onto the warranty. Dealers' service departments dislike warranty work that include addressing issues that other dealerships' service departments neglected to address due to laziness. Unfortunately, you are not the only person to complain about inadequately prepared MB Approved Used automobiles on this platform.

2. If you do not want the automobile, you have two alternatives. You may request the dealer to exchange the automobile for a different vehicle, as allowed by the Approved Used Terms and Conditions within 30 days of buying it. Swapping the automobile may be done without providing a reason, as long as the dealer has another car in stock that you prefer and is within the same price range. The second choice is to decline the automobile and get a complete reimbursement, as permitted by the Consumer Rights Act 2015, within 30 days after buying it. For example, if the automobile has a significant issue during the first 30 days, the dealer is legally required to accept its return and provide a complete refund. If you choose not to keep the automobile, you are not obligated to allow the dealer to fix any issues. Refer to:

https://www.thecarexpert.co.uk/rejecting-a-car/#

3. If you purchased the automobile via financing, notify your loan provider and they will advocate on your behalf. If you spent over £100 using a credit card, such as paying the deposit, notify your credit card provider. Regardless of the situation, the credit provider is responsible for covering the whole cost of the automobile as stipulated by the Consumer Credit Act 1974.

4. If you choose to retain the automobile once it has been fixed, contact the original dealer and demand that they cover the repair expenses at your local dealer. The local dealer will fix the automobile at no expense to you, eliminating the need for you to transport it to the supplying dealer 200 miles away. Depending on the repair costs, the dealer may give a refund instead of covering the repair fee. For instance, a new gearbox from Mercedes-Benz might be rather expensive.

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The car's delivery with a clear and severe problem reflects poorly on the dealer who sold it to you. Return it promptly to get a complete reimbursement while the option is still available. Shift the responsibility on others, not to yourself.
Purchase a vehicle from a reputable dealer located closer to your house.

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Doesn't a 2-year-old automobile still have a bumper-to-bumper factory warranty? Simply return it to an MB dealership to address the issue?

Am I misinterpreting anything here?

What is the timeframe between when you bought/collected/received the item and when it stopped working? Can we reject or return this?

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The issue was evident upon delivery.
    The next day, I informed the salesman.
    I scheduled an inspection for the vehicle at my independent shop 6 days after it was delivered.
    The automobile was inspected by roadside assistance the next day, and they recommended taking it to the closest dealership for repairs covered under warranty.
    The Mercedes-Benz dealership has kept my car for four business days, and I have not received any updates.


I am strongly considering returning the automobile due to my lack of interest in dealing with any delays that might impact my statutory rights.

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That is precisely what artificial intelligence would achieve.

Inform the dealer that you are rejecting the automobile under the Consumer Rights Act 2015 and that the Approved Used Terms and Conditions are meaningless since they cannot override your statutory rights.

You may also get a letter form online for rejecting a new automobile because of a significant issue that occurred inside the first 30 days.

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The automobile is less than 3 years old, thus it is covered by the usual new car warranty, not an Approved Used warranty. Charging a refundable inquiry charge is common for AU warranty claims, but I have not seen this practice with the manufacturer's warranties, despite having made claims on both in the past. Any dealership is obligated to do a warranty repair, and one would expect the automobile to be in optimal mechanical condition thereafter. If a product fails early on, it is likely due to a manufacturing error. It would be quite unlikely for the same issue to occur again unless there is a fundamental problem with the B200.

May I ask how many kilometres it has travelled?

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I assume the person the original poster was conversing with was unaware that the product still had a portion of the 3-year manufacturer's guarantee remaining. When I scheduled my old C Class for investigation under the manufacturer's warranty, the service bookings contact centre representative said there would be a diagnostic cost. I disregarded her statement since I believed it was nonsense. I informed the service adviser at my dealership when I brought the vehicle in. He just shook his head and said, "they persist in doing that."

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If you are satisfied with the automobile and willing to handle the hassle of repairs, contact the dealer where you left it and get an update. If you dislike the automobile, then decline it. I wouldn't waste time.

I suggest giving the providing dealer the chance to rectify the issue by the end of next week. If they fail to do so, request a full refund.

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If I were to find the model of the automobile appealing, I would contact the dealer to request a complete refund under the authorised used programme owing to a significant mechanical problem.

I would want them to find me a suitable substitute.

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