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I had to pay £150 for a defective Front Cigarette Lighter.


Liveek

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Approximately 6 months ago, I purchased my E220D Mercedes-Benz certified pre-owned vehicle.
The automobile was brought to me with the guarantee that everything had been thoroughly examined...
I found out that the front Cigarette Lighter socket was not functional, but the back one was working.
Due to the distance of the dealer from my location (a 2-hour vehicle drive), I contacted the Salesperson who informed me that I could take the car to any nearby MB dealer for warranty repairs since the car is covered by a 12-month MB warranty.
Due of my hectic schedule, I waited until a week ago to use the rear Cigarette Lighter connection for my Dash cam. When I brought my automobile to a nearby Mercedes-Benz dealership, they did not provide any information upon my arrival.
The dealer called me a few hours later to inform me that they needed to repair a fuse, which is not covered by the warranty. They said that I would be charged an inspection cost of £120 plus VAT.
I was billed £150 for the inspection fee, but I was informed that the fuse was provided at no cost.
Whom should I contact to get reimbursement of the £150? Will it be the dealer who sold me the "approved" automobile, the second local dealer who mislead me, or the MB headquarters?
I have the invoice for the defective Front Cigarette Lighter socket.
Assistance would be welcomed.
Thank you

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a. They are only permitted to charge you an inspection fee if you have given prior consent. It is probable that you signed certain papers when you rented the automobile, and the fine print may include an inspection price. Request a copy if you have signed any documents. If you did not provide your signature, you are entitled to request a refund as you should have been given prior notice on the possible expenses. If you made a payment using a Credit Card and the dealer is unwilling to cooperate, you may request a refund from the Credit Card issuer after attempting to resolve the matter with the dealer.


If a vehicle was bought within the last 6 months and a defect appears within this time, it is presumed to have been present at the time of purchase until proved otherwise. According to the Consumer Rights Act 2015, the dealer must repair the issue at no cost to the consumer. You may still make a claim under this section after the first 6-month term has ended if you can demonstrate that you reported the matter to the dealer before the initial 6-month period elapsed.

This issue is not related to the manufacturer's warranty but rather to consumer protection laws. Therefore, it is only a problem between you and the dealer who sold you the product. No other Mercedes-Benz dealer or the Mercedes-Benz Approved Used warranty is included.

Insist that the supplying dealer reimburse you for the amount you paid to the local dealer, using the Consumer Protection Act 2015. The supplying dealer technically has the right to ask you to return the car to them. However, in this situation, they actually recommended you to go to a local dealer. They made this suggestion under the mistaken assumption that the local dealer would fix the issue for free. This mistake is the responsibility of the supplying dealer.

If the supplying dealer refuses to repay you and you have paid with a Credit Card, you may seek the refund from your Credit Card issuer.


This illustrates the risks of purchasing a Mercedes-Benz vehicle from a distant Mercedes-Benz dealership. The MB Approved Used warranty does not cover defects that should have been identified and fixed before delivery. Your local dealer may have waived the inspection cost if you had purchased the automobile from them. However, dealers get upset when they are requested to fix warranty issues that should have been addressed by other dealers before the sale.

Good luck.

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Captiva  Thank you for your thorough response.
I still possess the email I received from the salesman after contacting him following the car's delivery. His message stated: "Hi, You can schedule the vehicle for service at a nearby dealer, where they can offer a courtesy car if needed, and the repairs will be covered under warranty." Regards.
Should I personally write the manager/director of the dealership referencing the email conversation, repair receipt, and the Consumer Protection Act 2015?
Thank you

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"What are my rights after 30 days?"If an issue arises within 30 days and six months after purchase, you are eligible to ask for a repair or a replacement car. The seller of the automobile must establish that the issue did not exist when the car was sold. If they can do so and it is probable that you were aware of the fault, you will not get a refund.

Requesting a new vehicle in this situation would have been excessive, however you should definitely seek reimbursement for the repair costs from the providing dealer, since they advised you to take the car to your local dealer.

I would recommend sending an email to the company stating that you followed their advice and had the car inspected by your local dealer. The repair needed was not covered by warranty, and you are requesting a refund for the cost as they are responsible for the repair under the Consumer Protection Act 2015. Attached is the repair bill for reference.

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If someone suggests that you should have stopped the repair after learning it wasn't covered by warranty and contacted them instead to pay your local dealer directly, you can respond by saying that no one instructed you to do so.

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Let's clarify this. Your cigarette lighter malfunctioned due to a blown fuse. Any someone with basic knowledge of autos would have instinctively accessed the fuse box, inspected the fuse, and changed it. Total effort: 10 minutes of unskilled labour by the trainee.

There was no inspection conducted. It's nonsense. Instruct the seller to address the billing issue with his colleagues.

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I am curious about what caused the fuse to blow, specifically the timing of the event.

Any reputable dealer would inspect the fuse promptly, since it was formerly considered a standard part of customer care.

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The original poster may have made a mistake by suggesting to the local dealer that the issue existed from the beginning and that the providing dealer recommended resolving it under the Australian warranty.

Dealers dislike this situation when certain dealers provide insufficient Pre-Delivery Inspection (PDI) and then attempt to pass the issue on to other dealers. The amount the OP was charged could have been a punitive cost. If the OP had just brought the vehicle with the defect and not provided the background narrative, the dealer may have prioritised earning a new client for future services above resolving the issue with the supplier dealer.

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